Esther: Lessons We Can Learn

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Some may wonder why the book of Esther is in the Bible. The main question people have surrounding Esther is ‘why is God’s name not mentioned by name?’ While it’s true God does not appear by name in this book, it is evident that God’s hand is working in the life of Queen Esther. In this study, we are going to look at a few lessons we can learn from Esther that may go unnoticed. Let us begin the intriguing story of Queen Esther.

Before we start, we need a background of just what happens in this book. So here’s a quick summary. King Xerxes of the Persian Empire saw Esther favorable in his eyes and made her queen. Now Esther had a cousin named Mordecai who respected her greatly. However, there’s always a bad guy in a good story and in this case it’s Haman, an advisor to King Xerxes. After Mordecai refuses to bow down to Haman, he became enraged and wanted to destroy the Jewish people. Now Queen Esther was a Jew in fact and after Mordecai told Esther of Haman’s plot she became concerned for her people. So Mordecai pleaded with Esther to speak to the king on behalf of the people. So, she fasted for 3 days. After the fast, she told the king of Haman’s plans and he had Haman hung and the people were saved. So what can we learn from this story? We can learn that God has a plan for all of us and that in everything, courage is key.

God has a specific plan and purpose for all of us. Esther 4:12-14 says, “When Esther’s words were reported to Mordecai, he sent back this answer: “Do not think that because you are in the king’s house you alone of all the Jews will escape. For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to your royal position for such a time as this?”” Mordecai was telling Esther that this might be the exact reason she is in the position she was in. She had a chance to save her people, and her position was the only one that could change the devastating events that were about to take place. God had a plan for Esther and she took those plans and ran with them. Jeremiah 29:11 says, “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”” God has a plan for each of us and if we are willing to listen and obey those plans, they will make us prosper, they will give us hope, and they will give us a bright future. What a great thing to remember, that God has a plan for each of us, and each plan is perfect and good.  

We need to be courageous. Esther 4:16 says, “Go, gather together all the Jews who are in Susa, and fast for me. Do not eat or drink for three days, night or day. I and my attendants will fast as you do. When this is done, I will go to the king, even though it is against the law. And if I perish, I perish.” Going to the king without being summoned first could be your death sentence. Esther knew the risks of doing this but she did it anyway. She knew she had to save her people from complete extinction but she herself could likely die in the process. What great courage she had to have had. Joshua 1:9 tells us, “Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” God is with us wherever we go and he was with Esther as she approached the king on behalf of His people. A great lesson learned from this wonderful story.

There are many lessons we can learn from the story of Esther but these two are the ones that stick out most prominently. Being courageous even when death is on the line and knowing God has a bright, perfect plan for us are two very important lessons we can learn from this amazing story. What started out as death sentence for a group of people, ended with the deliverance of them. The story of Esther is truly an amazing story, and God’s hand is prominently seen throughout the book.   

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